Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
0:00 0:00
Available On Air Stations
An initiative to provide nonpartisan, independent elections journalism for southwestern Pennsylvania.

Voter guide to the 2024 Pennsylvania attorney general election: Democratic and Republican primaries

Attorney general candidates, clockwise from top left: Keir Bradford-Grey, Eugene DePasquale, Joe Khan, Jared Solomon, Craig Williams, Dave Sunday and Jack Stollsteimer.
AP, campaigns
Attorney general candidates, clockwise from top left: Keir Bradford-Grey, Eugene DePasquale, Joe Khan, Jared Solomon, Craig Williams, Dave Sunday and Jack Stollsteimer.

What’s at stake: Between 1980 and 2012, Republicans won every race to serve as Pennsylvania attorney general; since then, it’s been all Democrats. The Republican primary features a pugnacious state legislator against a party-endorsed district attorney who promotes a collaborative approach. The five Democrats have few policy differences but a wide range of experiences. The question of electability will be of chief concern because there are substantial differences between the parties on issues such as abortion rights, the legalization of marijuana and capital punishment. But for many of the issues that are more directly under the attorney general’s purview — such as consumer protection and prosecuting drug traffickers — all seven candidates share similar outlooks. One exception is environmental issues, where the Republicans oppose Pennsylvania joining a regional climate pact, while several Democrats say they will vigorously enforce environmental laws.

Further Reading: 

GOP attorney general candidates clash over Krasner, criminal justice reform” (Oliver Morrison, WESA)
Pennsylvania attorney general candidates bring wide array of experiences to TV debate” (Oliver Morrison, WESA)
Democrats running for Pennsylvania attorney general walk fine line on criminal justice reform” (Oliver Morrison, WESA)


Democrats

Keir Bradford-Grey

Courtesy campaign
Keir Bradford-Grey

The only career public defender in the race, Bradford-Grey said she would be in the best position to understand why people commit crimes, how to prevent them from happening and how to prosecute them when they do. In addition to fulfilling the main job requirements, she says she is interested in ensuring everyone has access to housing, health care and education. And as the only woman in the race, she says she believes she would do the best job at protecting abortion rights.

Party: Democratic
Place of residence: Philadelphia
Education: B.A., Albany State University, Ohio Northern University Pettit School of Law
Current occupation: Partner, Montgomery McCracken Walker & Rhoads
Related experience: Chief Defender of Philadelphia (2015 - 2021); Chief Defender of Montgomery County (2012 - 2015); Assistant Federal Defender, District of Delaware (2007 - 2012); Assistant Public Defender, Defender Association of Philadelphia (1997 - 2007); Commissioner, Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency; Chair of Racial and Ethnic Disparities subcommittee; Pennsylvania State Law Enforcement Community Advisory Commission Commissioner; Commission on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency
Supporters/endorsements: Emily's List, The Collective PAC, Higher Heights, NEPA Progressive Women PAC, state Sen. Tony Williams, Laborers Local 332, Ernest Garrett, Philadelphia City Councilmembers Isaiah Thomas, Jaime Gauthier, Kendra Brooks, Quetcy Lozada, state Reps. Carol Kazeem, Regina Young, Gina Curry and Heather Boyd, Collingdale Council member Felecia Coffee and Upper Darby Council member Michelle Billups, Council member Janet Diaz
Links: Website | Facebook | X | Instagram
Total fundraising (as of 3/21/24): 
Total raised (2024): $50,531 (plus an additional $211,467 from 2023)
Total spent (2024): $147,935

WESA Candidate Survey

What's the most urgent public safety concern you would address as attorney general, and how would you do so?
As Attorney General, my primary focus is addressing escalating gun violence, leveraging my unique vantage point as a former Public Defender. I'll hold businesses accountable, ensuring licensed dealers follow common-sense gun laws. Targeting illegal gun distribution through private transfers, I'll implement a law enforcement approach covering all areas of gun transactions. Advocating for comprehensive gun control measures, I'll collaborate with law enforcement, community leaders, and victims' advocates. Initiatives like gun buyback programs and community outreach, rooted in redirecting resources to address root causes, aim to create sustainable solutions for safer communities.

Recent years have seen a national call for changes to the criminal justice system, and Pennsylvania has seen efforts to take a less punitive approach on, for example, minor drug offenses. What reforms, if any, would you champion as AG, and which, if any, do you think are mistaken?
As Attorney General, I'd champion reforms for a more efficient, equitable, and safety-focused justice system. Drawing from my Chief Defender experience, I've instituted structural changes, providing more opportunities for fact-based pre-trial decisions. I created roles gathering essential information and presenting community-based supports as alternatives to incarceration. While supporting initiatives to decriminalize minor drug offenses, I emphasize diversion programs. I believe in reducing reliance on cash bail, advocating for alternatives studied by UPenn, showing significant impacts on court appearances, reducing disparities, and lowering recidivism. My reform approach ensures taxpayer efficiency, equitable processes, and enhanced public safety without compromising justice.

As attorney general, you'd sit on a board that makes pardon recommendations to the governor. John Fetterman, who sat on the board as lieutenant governor, once said that when in doubt, the board should "err on the side of mercy and let the governor decide." Do you share that view of the board's role, and why or why not?
I share the view that the pardon board should prioritize mercy, acknowledging the transformative potential of redemption. Recognizing the plight of those with real claims of innocence, especially in time-barred cases, mercy should guide the board's decisions. While considering victims' voices in the process, a compassionate lens is crucial for rehabilitation and second chances. However, I also emphasize a careful and thorough evaluation process to ensure recommendations align with public safety. Balancing mercy with a rigorous assessment upholds the pardon system's integrity, seeking justice for those with genuine claims while maintaining thorough scrutiny for societal well-being.

The AG's office handles more than just criminal cases, with divisions focused on matters such as consumer protection and overseeing nonprofits. What responsibilities of the office, in your view, deserve more attention and why?
As Attorney General, I'll prioritize challenging powerful interests, including corporate polluters, predatory lenders, and actors involved in price gouging and wage theft. This focus aims to protect Pennsylvanians from various forms of exploitation — ensuring access to vital services like healthcare and housing. Holding accountable those who steal from our pockets, tables, or roofs, I'll address crimes committed in boardrooms, such as illegal gun distribution and pharmaceutical companies' false advertising. Keen oversight on nonprofit activities will maintain transparency. This commitment underscores my dedication to being the people's lawyer, advocating for fairness, justice, and the overall well-being of every Pennsylvanian.

When he was attorney general, Gov. Josh Shapiro pursued the distribution of "ghost guns" — untraceable firearms assembled from parts ordered or made separately. Would you continue those efforts, and in general what do you see as the best approach to gun violence?
I commend Governor Shapiro for addressing the root cause of "ghost guns." I will unequivocally continue and strengthen efforts to curb their distribution, recognizing the threat to public safety. Advocating for stricter gun control measures, supporting community policing, and investing in smart technology, I'll pursue a comprehensive strategy against gun violence. Additionally, I'll collaborate with other Attorneys General in lawsuits targeting ghost gun distribution. Simultaneously, I'll address violence's root causes through community-centered programs and mental health support, fostering a safer environment. My approach involves understanding and preventing the normalization of violence, particularly among youth.


Eugene DePasquale

Courtesy campaign
Eugene DePasquale

A former auditor general, DePasquale is the only Democrat who doesn’t live in the Philadelphia area. He’s a Pittsburgh guy, which has helped DePasquale rack up endorsements on the western side of the state and could help him if the Philadelphia vote is split. DePasquale toured the state as auditor general to learn about issues such as mental health. He notes that he is the only candidate with administrative experience in a statewide office, and he says some audits — like a look at untested rape kits — give him insight into the justice system, too.

Party: Democratic
Place of residence: Pittsburgh
Education: B.A., The College of Wooster (Ohio); Master’s degree in public administration, University of Pittsburgh; J.D., Widener University Commonwealth School of Law
Current occupation: Attorney, adjunct professor
Related experience: Pennsylvania Auditor General (2013 – 2021); State representative (2007 – 2013)
Links: Website | Facebook | X
Supporters/endorsements:
State Rep. Emily Kinkead, Beaver County Democratic Committee, Perry County Democratic Committee, Armstrong County Democratic Committee, Northumberland County Democratic Committee, Pittsburgh Federation of Teachers, Central Pennsylvania Building Trades, Ironworkers Local 3, Plumbers and Pipefitters Local 520, ATU Local 85, Operating Engineers Local 66, Bricklayers Local 5, Ricky's Pride PAC, United Rural Democrats, Pitt College Democrats, Steel City Stonewall Democrats
Total fundraising (as of 3/21/24):
Total raised (2024): $69,264 (plus an additional $179,965 from 2023)
Total spent (2024): $111,020 

WESA Candidate Survey

What's the most urgent public safety concern you would address as attorney general, and how would you do so?
I see gun violence as the most urgent public safety concern in our communities. As attorney general, I will work with law enforcement to protect our communities by investing in prevention tactics and holding those who threaten our safety accountable. I will also work to restore trust between residents and local law enforcement to ensure our police can best serve and protect the Commonwealth.

Recent years have seen a national call for changes to the criminal justice system, and Pennsylvania has seen efforts to take a less punitive approach on, for example, minor drug offenses. What reforms, if any, would you champion as AG, and which, if any, do you think are mistaken?
My father was a Vietnam veteran who returned home and like so many others, struggled with mental health and substance abuse until he got caught up in the criminal justice system. I am the child of a formerly incarcerated felon and I know the impacts and domino effect that incarceration can have on not just individuals, but their families as well. It would not be a priority of my administration to incarcerate minor drug offenders, especially not non-violent ones.

As attorney general, you'd sit on a board that makes pardon recommendations to the governor. John Fetterman, who sat on the board as lieutenant governor, once said that when in doubt, the board should "err on the side of mercy and let the governor decide." Do you share that view of the board's role, and why or why not?
Again, I am the child of a formerly incarcerated felon. I understand deeply the importance of punishing people for their crimes, but also what it means to give them a second chance.

The AG's office handles more than just criminal cases, with divisions focused on matters such as consumer protection and overseeing nonprofits. What responsibilities of the office, in your view, deserve more attention and why?
Consumer protection is an area that I think there is some important work to be done. As attorney general, I will be your legal advocate against corporate greed. I will crack down on businesses and CEOs taking advantage of consumers and help defend workers from wage theft, stop price gouging, and close tax loopholes.

When he was attorney general, Gov. Josh Shapiro pursued the distribution of "ghost guns" — untraceable firearms assembled from parts ordered or made separately. Would you continue those efforts, and in general what do you see as the best approach to gun violence?
The work Gov. Shapiro did on this issue was impactful, but we need to go farther with legislative changes as well, and I would advocate for those. States that have stronger gun laws have less gun violence, which is why I support universal background checks. I will also work with local and state authorities to get weapons of war off the streets and end cycles of retaliatory violence in Pennsylvanian urban communities.


Joe Khan

Courtesy campaign
Joe Khan

One of two prosecutors in the race, Khan is worried about crime in Philadelphia and says he’s more electable in a general election than other Democrats. He says he would vigorously prosecute environmental crimes and touts an endorsement from the Clean Air Action Fund. He’s also been a leader in going after social media companies that don’t provide protections for children.

Party: Democratic
Place of residence: Doylestown
Education: B.A., Swarthmore College; J.D., University of Chicago School of Law
Current occupation: Attorney
Related experience: County solicitor, Bucks County Law Department (2020 - 2023); Assistant United States Attorney, U.S. Attorney’s Office (2006 - 2016); Assistant District Attorney, Philadelphia District Attorney’s Office (2000 - 2006)
Supporters/endorsements: Clean Air Action Fund, Philadelphia Metal Trades Council, Asian Pacific Islander Political Alliance, Second Generation, Impact, and dozens of state and local elected officials, including state Rep. Matt Gergely of Allegheny County
Links: Website | Facebook | X | Instagram
Total fundraising (as of 3/21/24):
Total raised (2024): $109,069 (plus an additional $314,068 from 2023)
Total spent (2024): $80,795

WESA Candidate Survey

What's the most urgent public safety concern you would address as attorney general, and how would you do so?
The Attorney General has a duty to keep us safe from violent crime, as I’ve done and will continue to do as a career prosecutor. But the office has the power to do so much more than that. The AG must prosecute the kind of political and corporate corruption that I’ve taken on to keep us safe. And most urgently, the AG must keep us safe from attacks on our rights, including reproductive rights, voting rights, and environmental rights. I’ve gone to court against the MAGA Republicans to protect these rights and will continue this mission as Attorney General.

Recent years have seen a national call for changes to the criminal justice system, and Pennsylvania has seen efforts to take a less punitive approach on, for example, minor drug offenses. What reforms, if any, would you champion as AG, and which, if any, do you think are mistaken?
First, as the top prosecutor in the state, I’ll provide a model for best practices and priorities on issues like bail, forfeiture, and diversion, where my successful leadership will provide templates for legislative reform. Second, by providing statewide leadership on rooting out police corruption, I will help change the culture of cronyism that flourishes in too many DA’s Offices. Finally, as a career prosecutor, I will use my pardon power fearlessly in righting wrongs that occurred in the past, such as convictions that resulted from the unfair and unequal application of marijuana laws in communities of color.

As attorney general, you'd sit on a board that makes pardon recommendations to the governor. John Fetterman, who sat on the board as lieutenant governor, once said that when in doubt, the board should "err on the side of mercy and let the governor decide." Do you share that view of the board's role, and why or why not?
We don’t have to choose between respecting the rights of defendants and victims; justice requires that we try to get it right in every case. I’ve served on many boards where I brought my colleagues together around difficult decisions, and the Board of Pardons provides a similar opportunity. In Bucks County, for example, I leveraged my credibility as a former prosecutor to not only create a Pardons and Expungement Unit but also to enact a “ban the box” hiring policy — all part of a larger effort to reduce barriers for those seeking a fair shot at a second chance.

The AG's office handles more than just criminal cases, with divisions focused on matters such as consumer protection and overseeing nonprofits. What responsibilities of the office, in your view, deserve more attention and why?
I think less about the distinction between criminal and civil enforcement and more about the issues that only the AG can address through the unique ability to use all of those powers. I want to be Attorney General to offer transformative solutions to problems like the housing crisis, wage suppression, disparities in insurance coverage, underfunded public education, and environmental injustice. For example, I will create a Housing Justice Unit to address our housing crisis using tools like civil complaints, consumer protection actions, and criminal prosecutions. Similarly, I’ll restructure the Environmental Crimes Unit to address the broader issue of environmental justice.

When he was attorney general, Gov. Josh Shapiro pursued the distribution of "ghost guns" — untraceable firearms assembled from parts ordered or made separately. Would you continue those efforts, and in general what do you see as the best approach to gun violence?
Yes. As a federal prosecutor tasked with reducing gun violence in Southwest Philadelphia, we tackled the problem by bringing people together to bring a strategic focus to our interventions through arrests and prosecutions. Working together, we not only interrupted escalating patterns of retaliatory violence, we broke up gun trafficking rings, closed unsolved homicides, and created pathways to redemption for former offenders who wanted to make things right. 15 years later, stopping the proliferation of ghost guns will require the same kind of creative collaboration, not only with the 67 DAs in Pennsylvania but also with other Attorneys General.


Jared Solomon

Courtesy campaign
Jared Solomon

The state legislator says he would be the most accessible attorney general and would try to run the office with the same approach that he’s taken to neighborhoods in his district. He emphasized that he would provide a counterbalance to any efforts by Republican Donald Trump to influence Democracy or abortion policy.

Party: Democratic
Place of residence: Northeast Philadelphia
Education: B.A., Swarthmore College; J.D., Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law
Current occupation: State representative and Judge Advocate General attorney, Pennsylvania National Guard
Related experience: Securities and antitrust attorney (2016 - present); JAG attorney (2012 - 2021); in state House, chairman of state House Veterans Affairs and Emergency Preparedness committee, co-chair of Black-Jewish Caucus
Supporters/endorsements: Pittsburgh Fire Fighters IAFF Local No. 1, United Food & Commercial Workers Local 1776, Transport Workers Union Local 234, and 20 members of the state legislature, including Allegheny County Reps. Dan Miller, Abigail Salisbury and Anita Kulik
Links: Website | Facebook | X | Instagram | YouTube
Total fundraising (as of 3/21/24):
Total raised (2024): $170,143 (plus an additional $1,017,447 from 2023)
Total spent (2024): $128,191

WESA Candidate Survey

What's the most urgent public safety concern you would address as attorney general, and how would you do so?
Jared believes the opioid epidemic is Pennsylvania’s top public safety crisis and we need a multi-pronged approach that includes prevention, enforcement, treatment, and recovery. In his House district, Jared took action by locating a substance abuse and mental health provider next to law enforcement so people with drug and mental health issues would have their criminal charges dropped if they went through approved programs. As AG, Jared would follow the successes of the Colorado Opioids Response Model with a region-centric plan that gives communities flexibility. Jared will bolster interdiction and interception of these drugs as they enter Pennsylvania and prosecute fentanyl traffickers to the fullest extent of the law.

Recent years have seen a national call for changes to the criminal justice system, and Pennsylvania has seen efforts to take a less punitive approach on, for example, minor drug offenses. What reforms, if any, would you champion as AG, and which, if any, do you think are mistaken?
Jared supports legalizing marijuana for adult medical and recreational use. Jared also supports Governor Shapiro’s call for legalization to include expungement for those in jail or who have served time for possessing small amounts of marijuana. In the State House, Jared was a proud sponsor of House Bill 689, known as Clean Slate 3.0, which builds on Pennsylvania’s original Clean Slate law by making low-level, non-violent drug felonies with a maximum sentence of 30 months eligible for automated sealing. Over a million Pennsylvanians have benefited from the original Clean Slate law, which is supported by law enforcement and the business community.

As attorney general, you'd sit on a board that makes pardon recommendations to the governor. John Fetterman, who sat on the board as lieutenant governor, once said that when in doubt, the board should "err on the side of mercy and let the governor decide." Do you share that view of the board's role, and why or why not?
Any change to the current constitutional requirement — a unanimous 5 out of 5 pardon board vote before the Governor can even review a recommendation — would need to pass both chambers of the General Assembly in two consecutive sessions and be put to the voters as a referendum. Jared believes that any system of justice requires mercy and he supports allowing the voters to decide on reforms that would allow the Governor to make more decisions on pardons and commutations.

The AG's office handles more than just criminal cases, with divisions focused on matters such as consumer protection and overseeing nonprofits. What responsibilities of the office, in your view, deserve more attention and why?
The next Attorney General will be responsible for defending our most fundamental rights in Pennsylvania. Jared has a lifetime 100% voting scorecard from Planned Parenthood Pennsylvania Advocates and he will always protect and defend women’s access to abortion in Pennsylvania. Jared will work tirelessly to ensure that all Pennsylvanians can exercise their Constitutional right to the ballot box in free and fair elections. He will conserve and maintain our environment by holding corporate polluters, frackers, or illegal dumpers accountable when they commit environmental crimes. Jared will always fight to protect Pennsylvania workers from wage theft and uphold their right to bargain collectively.

When he was attorney general, Gov. Josh Shapiro pursued the distribution of "ghost guns" — untraceable firearms assembled from parts ordered or made separately. Would you continue those efforts, and in general what do you see as the best approach to gun violence?
Jared will take on the gun lobby, reckless gun retailers, and ghost gun manufacturers. Jared would bolster investment in tools that have already shown promise, including gun-violence intervention initiatives and the gun-violence task-force model where prosecutors and field agents supplement local law enforcement. Jared will expand statewide the community-based programs he has implemented to reduce crime in his community, like turning blighted properties into parks, lighting, home repairs, and greening up gun-violence-plagued blocks. Jared will work with the legislature to bring common sense gun reforms to Pennsylvania, including stronger red-flag laws, a ban on assault weapons, expanded background checks, and shutting the ghost gun loophole.


Jack Stollsteimer

Courtesy campaign
Jack Stollsteimer

An old-school prosecutor, Stollsteimer takes the most severe approach to crime among the Democrats, but there isn’t much rhetorical distance between him and the others. He is against capital punishment but said he might support it in the case of police officer killings. He also has worked to reduce the prison population and close a for-profit prison. He’s gained union support because of his work prosecuting wage theft.

Party: Democratic
Place of Residence: Havertown
Education: Thomas Edison State College and Temple University School of Law
Current Occupation: Delaware County District Attorney
Related Experience: Deputy State Treasurer (2017 - 2020); Deputy Chief Counsel at Pennsylvania Treasury (2010 - 20130; Assistant United States Attorney (2001 - 2006)
Supporters/endorsements: Pennsylvania Building Trades Council, Philadelphia Regional Building Trades Council, Pittsburgh Regional Building Trades Council, Delaware County Democrats, Chester County Democrats, Eastern Atlantic States Council of Carpenters, Teamsters Joint Council 53, FOP Lodge 27, U.S. Rep. Mary Gay Scanlon, Recommended for statewide endorsement by the Allegheny-Fayette Labor Council
Links: Website | Facebook | X
Total fundraising (as of 3/21/24):
Total raised (2024): $232,737 (plus an additional $368,428 from 2023)
Total spent (2024): $82,329

WESA Candidate Survey

What's the most urgent public safety concern you would address as attorney general, and how would you do so?
Gun violence is the number one public safety concern in Pennsylvania and the leading cause of death of our nation’s young people. As Attorney General, I will address the problem the same way I have as District Attorney: by implanting holistic, evidence-based community/law enforcement partnerships in each of our 67 counties. Using this approach, as District Attorney I have reduced gun violence by 72% over the last four years in the City of Chester, Delaware County.

Recent years have seen a national call for changes to the criminal justice system, and Pennsylvania has seen efforts to take a less punitive approach on, for example, minor drug offenses. What reforms, if any, would you champion as AG, and which, if any, do you think are mistaken?
I am the only candidate for Attorney General who has reformed a criminal justice system. When I was elected DA in 2019, Delaware County’s jail was the Commonwealth’s only privately run prison and it was filled to capacity. As DA, we brought it back under public management, and we reduced the population by 40% by creating programs to keep low-level offenders out of the criminal justice system while still holding them accountable. As part of this reform effort, I also decriminalized the possession of small amounts marijuana for personal use. I will champion similar strategies to ensure law enforcement is smart as well as tough on crime.

As attorney general, you'd sit on a board that makes pardon recommendations to the governor. John Fetterman, who sat on the board as lieutenant governor, once said that when in doubt, the board should "err on the side of mercy and let the governor decide." Do you share that view of the board's role, and why or why not?
I will evaluate each request for a pardon on a case-by-case basis, balancing mercy to the applicant with justice for victims. As District Attorney, I get requests to support applications for pardons from individuals who committed crimes in my county. I evaluate those requests based on the merits and have recommended pardons when appropriate. As I’ve said before in pardon hearings, we often talk about giving people second chances, but find it hard to put our money where our mouth is. As a board member, I will remind myself that the purpose of the pardon process is to find souls worthy of redemption.

The AG's office handles more than just criminal cases, with divisions focused on matters such as consumer protection and overseeing nonprofits. What responsibilities of the office, in your view, deserve more attention and why?
As District Attorney, I share some of the same powers as the Attorney General when it comes to consumer protection. I have used those powers to successfully sue opioid distributors to bring tens of millions of dollars home to Delaware County to help people with substance abuse disorders. I have taken on big chemical companies over the “forever chemicals” they have knowingly put into our bodies and our drinking water. And I have taken contractors to court over wage theft — the first DA to successfully do so. I will expand on this work. In addition, I will vigorously protect a woman’s right to reproductive health.

When he was attorney general, Gov. Josh Shapiro pursued the distribution of "ghost guns" untraceable firearms assembled from parts ordered or made separately. Would you continue those efforts, and in general what do you see as the best approach to gun violence?
As District Attorney, I see everyday the effects of these “ghost guns” which are nothing more than junk guns sold to criminals because they are untraceable. I am proud that my Office, in consultation with the Attorney General’s Office, brought one of the first prosecutions of someone possessing a ghost gun. However, we need more tools in the toolbox to combat ghost guns. There is pending legislation at both the federal and state level that should be passed to disrupt access to these weapons. The time for our political leaders to act is now.


Republicans

Dave Sunday

Dave Sunday.
Provided
/
Courtesy campaign
Dave Sunday

Sunday is relying on his experience as a prosecutor and his endorsement by the state Republican party to serve as a proxy for his conservative and mainstream bona fides. His Republican challenger has criticized Sunday for being a registered Democrat in his 30s. Sunday says his experience prosecuting tough homicides, including capital punishment cases, will help him as attorney general. He says that he worked with the community after the murder of George Floyd to lower violent crime and homicides.

Party: Republican
Place of residence: York County
Education: B.A., Penn State University; J.D., Widener University Delaware Law School
Current occupation: District Attorney, York County (2018 - present)
Links: Website l Facebook l X
Total fundraising (as of 3/21/24):
Total raised (2024): $162,155 (plus an additional $51,095 from 2023)
Total spent (2024): $36,001

WESA Candidate Survey
Sunday did not respond to the WESA Candidate Survey.


Craig Williams

A man in a blue suit jacket and red tie stands in front of a microphone
Matt Rourke
/
AP
Craig Williams

A state legislator and former U.S. Marine, Williams has distinguished himself with his tough-on-crime rhetoric. He has criticized Gov. Josh Shapiro for not doing more on alleged voter fraud as attorney general and flip-flopping on capital punishment; Williams has said he would consider it part of his job to counter Shapiro. He also led the effort to impeach Philadelphia District Attorney Larry Krasner for being “soft on crime.” Williams has also criticized the current state of Pennsylvania’s Republican party.

Party: Republican
Place of Residence: Glen Mills.
Education: B.A,. Duke University; J.D, University of Florida Levin College of Law; Master of Laws degree, Columbia University School of Law
Current occupation: Pennsylvania State Representative (2021 - present)
Links: Website l X l Facebook
Total fundraising (as of 3/21/24):
Total raised (2024): $112,644 (plus an additional $42,191 from 2023)
Total spent (2024): $41,307

WESA Candidate Survey
Williams did not respond to the WESA Candidate Survey.

Oliver Morrison is a general assignment reporter at WESA. He previously covered education, environment and health for PublicSource in Pittsburgh and, before that, breaking news and weekend features for the Wichita Eagle in Kansas.