Margaret J. Krauss

Development and Transportation Reporter

Margaret J. Krauss is WESA's development and transportation reporter. She previously worked for Keystone Crossroads, a statewide reporting initiative that covers problems facing Pennsylvania's cities and possible solutions. Before joining Keystone Crossroads, Margaret produced a 48-part radio series about Pittsburgh's lesser-known history, biking 2,000 miles around the region to do so.

Ways to Connect

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

Pittsburgh International Airport will soon break ground on its World Trade Center site. The 195-acre development is expected to host energy and advanced manufacturing facilities.

Allegheny County first paid for a World Trade Center designation decades ago, but its purpose has only recently come into focus, said Vince Gastgeb, the airport’s vice president of government and community affairs.

Margaret J. Krauss / 90.5 WESA

On Friday the board of the Allegheny County Airport Authority voted to prohibit members from directly investing in airlines.

The amendment to the authority’s administrative policy handbook comes after two board members, Jan Rea and vice chairman Robert Lewis, acknowledged their investments in OneJet.

Margaret J. Krauss / 90.5 WESA

Tucked in a corner of Module’s East Liberty offices is a bunch of model home prototypes. CEO Brian Gaudio picks up the Pittsburgh start-up’s first one.

Margaret J. Krauss / 90.5 WESA

Baseball is full of disappointments: strikeouts, fielding errors, hitting into double plays. And in the minors, those moments carry extra weight; every guy has his sights set on getting called up to the big leagues. For Jonathan Schwind, there was only one way to stay positive through a long season: take it one day at a time.

Margaret J. Krauss / 90.5 WESA

Hundreds of millions of gallons of stormwater flow into Pittsburgh’s sewer system during hard rains, which results in chronic flooding and sewage backups. A massive green infrastructure project slated for Four Mile Run could significantly reduce those problems, Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority officials said.

Margaret J. Krauss / 90.5 WESA

Lowell Friedline struck out on his own as a dairy farmer in 1988 when he started buying his farm in installments from his dad. By the time his father died, Friedline was nearly debt-free. It’s been part of his philosophy ever since: don’t buy what you don’t know how to pay for. But for small farms like the one he and his family work, the margins are slim.

Margaret J. Krauss / 90.5 WESA

Whistles are essential equipment for a number of jobs: gym teacher, football referee, traffic cop. But the humble whistle is perhaps most at home in the hands of a lifeguard, as Alexxis Turner explained. She was the head guard for Phillips Pool in the City of Pittsburgh.

Kailey Love / 90.5 WESA

Residents can offer feedback on Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority’s proposed rate increases for water and sewer conveyance at a series of public hearings this week.

Margaret J. Krauss / 90.5 WESA

Field maintenance can mean the difference between a cleanly fielded grounder or a nasty hop, between a successful sprint to first base or a fall in the infield. At People’s Natural Gas field, home to the Double-A team the Altoona Curve and 100 miles east of Pittsburgh, it all rests on McClain Murphy’s shoulders. He’s the head groundskeeper.

Margaret Sun / 90.5 WESA

There should be a word for the particular kind of helpless rage that comes from waiting – in the cold, in the heat, in the rain –for a bus or train to materialize, especially if it was due several minutes ago.

Margaret J. Krauss / 90.5 WESA

Millions of Americans work outside, in agriculture and fishing, construction and shipping, and in the burgeoning outdoor hospitality industry. While it may seem dreamy to office workers the world over, people who work outside often face tougher conditions, from longer hours or seasonal work to how much their bodies can take. In this episode of Still Working, we talk with a minor league baseball playera dairy farmer, and a City of Pittsburgh lifeguard. Each of their workplaces carries a whiff of nostalgia: the glory of a summer ballgame, the steadfastness of the small American farmer, the sweet relief of the pool on a scorcher of a summer day. But they’re also challenging places to work.

Google Maps

Residents and supporters marched out of Hazelwood on Irvine Street Monday morning in an attempt to force changes to the busy road. Because of the neighborhood’s geography — squeezed between a hillside and the Monongahela River — the state-owned street is a principal entry and exit point.

But while it’s marked at 25 mph, many drivers take Irvine much faster.

While it does have a sidewalk, many parts of it are overgrown or uneven. In Pennsylvania, sidewalk maintenance is the responsibility of property owners.

Margaret J. Krauss / 90.5 WESA

Every morning, staggered by time zones and separated by continents, people around the world wake up and go to work. No two people are the same, and everyone experiences the world differently. Yet we all share one thing in common: we have to go to work.

Margaret J. Krauss / 90.5 WESA

Pittsburgh’s Department of Mobility and Infrastructure Wednesday night convened a public meeting on the planned renovation of Smallman Street in the Strip District, just three weeks after a similar event.

Margaret J. Krauss / 90.5 WESA

Partial light rail service will resume Thursday at Station Square, Port Authority officials said.

Google Maps

For most of its history, Hazelwood was a hopping place: it had LTV Steel’s coke works, a trolley line to downtown, a busy shopping district. But like a lot of neighborhoods, Hazelwood suffered during Pittsburgh’s economic decline.

Jake Savitz / 90.5 WESA

The board of the Urban Redevelopment Authority approved next steps for Pittsburgh’s bus rapid transit project on Thursday. City of Pittsburgh and Port Authority officials are preparing to re-submit a federal funding request.

Margaret J. Krauss / 90.5 WESA

American pools traditionally follow the social arc of summer, opening Memorial Day Weekend and closing up shop at the end of Labor Day weekend.

Margaret J. Krauss / 90.5 WESA

As person after person stepped through the door of Peace, Love and Zen – a wellness center  in Pittsburgh’s East Liberty neighborhood last week, they joined the awkward circle people make when they expect to be members of an audience. They were lit by the gentle glow of the wellness center’s Himalayan salt lamps, set into cubbies near the ceiling.

UPMC

The community benefits agreement finalized with UPMC Mercy last week is very different from the Lower Hill agreement struck with the Pittsburgh Penguins, said city Councilman R. Daniel Lavelle, who was party to both negotiations.

Green Boulevard Strategic Plan

A lot can change in five years.

In March of 2013, the city, working with private partners and the public, completed a $1.5 million, federally-funded plan to rejuvenate the neighborhoods along a 6-mile stretch of the Allegheny River, from Downtown through Highland Park.

Margaret J. Krauss / 90.5 WESA

Business owners, residents and commuters seemed equally displeased with a plan to reconfigure Smallman Street, presented Tuesday night in the Strip District. The overhaul of a five-block stretch of the boulevard dovetails with the renovation of the Produce Terminal.

Margaret J. Krauss / 90.5 WESA

At its last regular meeting before an August recess, Pittsburgh City Councilors voted to approve new, permanent zoning for Pittsburgh's 35 miles of riverfront. 

City of Pittsburgh

The concept of accessory dwelling units—small, self-contained homes built in, on or near existing homes—has been sweeping the nation as a novel way to create more housing and temper hot markets

Depiction, LLC

In a presentation to the Pittsburgh Planning Commission this week, the project manager for Hazelwood Green said the 178-acre development could be transformative for Pittsburgh. 

Sarah Kovash

A handful of Uber’s autonomous vehicles returned to city streets Tuesday, but self-driving mode has been disabled. Instead, each car is being piloted the old-fashioned way: by a human driver with both hands on the wheel. The move comes as Pennsylvania issues new guidance for highly autonomous vehicles.

Kathleen J. Davis / 90.5 WESA

By Mayor Bill Peduto’s estimate, some 20 companies have expressed interest in the water side of the Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority. But that tumble of overtures has been absent an integral part of PWSA: sewers.

Liz Reid / 90.5 WESA

As the lights went down in the O’Hara Township council room, Peoples Gas CEO Morgan O’Brien began narrating a short video he’d brought to chambers.

Margaret J. Krauss / 90.5 WESA

Pittsburgh City Council wants to rewrite a cooperation agreement with the Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority to change how it's governed

Kailey Love / 90.5 WESA

People with low or moderate incomes are often the most transit-dependent—they rely on public transportation to access critical daily needs—but the least able to bear the cost

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