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Pennsylvania Board Of Education Chair Faces Sex Allegations

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Larry Wittig, the outgoing head of the Pennsylvania Board of Education, at a 2013 panel about Common Core and Keystone exams. Wittig has been accused of having sexual relations with underage women.

The longtime chairman of the Pennsylvania Board of Education is facing accusations that he pursued sexual relationships with teenage girls more than 35 years ago, when he was in his late 20s and early 30s.

Two women tell The Philadelphia Inquirer they had long-term sexual relationships with Larry Wittig beginning when they were 16 and 17. One of the women, Annette DeMichele, says her relationship with Wittig started in 1981, the summer after her high school graduation. She says it continued at the University of Pennsylvania, where he was her rowing coach.

Wittig denied the accusations to The Inquirer. He did not immediately return a phone call from The Associated Press Thursday.

After being contacted by the newspaper this week, Wittig told the state education department he is stepping away from the board.

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