Landslides

Jakob Lazzaro / 90.5 WESA

Route 30 is open to traffic again following the April landslide that destroyed a 300-foot section of the road near East Pittsburgh. Repairs included shoring up the collapsed hillside, installing a replacement drainage system, and adding a retaining wall anchored by steel piles at the base of the hill.

Margaret J. Krauss / 90.5 WESA

Construction crews are working around the clock to rebuild a section of Route 30 in East Pittsburgh, about 10 miles southeast of Pittsburgh. The road has been closed since April 7, when it collapsed due to a landslide.

Sarah Boden / 90.5 WESA

In Spring Hill, early 20th Century houses look out over cinematic views of downtown Pittsburgh. The front of 36-year-old resident Randal Miller’s home appears fine, but the back is a mess. Part of it was slammed by a landslide this February.

“The door broke in the first day,” he said. “It didn’t break in in a way that like you could move it, cause there’s like trees sticking through.”

Miller’s laundry room sustained the worst of the damage. Reddish mud and glass cake the floor and everything smell likes mildew.

Keith Srakocic / AP

Pittsburgh’s unusually rough winter and spring—rapid freeze-thaw cycles paired with record-level rains—led to more than a dozen landslides. Various city agencies, including the Department of Mobility and Infrastructure and the Department of Public Works responded, gathering information about Pittsburgh’s hillside geology in the process.

Governor Tom Wolf / Flickr

Officials with Pennsylvania's Department of Transportation say the 300-foot section of Route 30 that collapsed during a landslide in East Pittsburgh earlier this month will re-open in mid-July. 

Gov. Tom Wolf / Flickr

While PennDOT and local authorities are dealing with a destructive landslide that collapsed a stretch of Route 30 near East Pittsburgh and forced 30 people from their homes, the city of  Pittsburgh continues to address  a “record year for landslides” in the city.

Keith Srakocic / AP

This winter’s saturating rains and repeated freeze-thaw cycles have led to damaged roofs, thousands of potholes and landslides across several steep city hillsides. What are Pittsburgh leaders doing to help the 20 families displaced by Mother Nature, and how can they better address infrastructure needs?

90.5 WESA's Margaret J. Krauss joins the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review's Bob Bauder to discuss.

Coming up next....

Keith Srakocic / AP

It's not actually spring, but Pittsburgh's warm and rainy winter has made it hard to tell. 

Keith Srakocic / AP

A landslide in a Pittsburgh neighborhood has destroyed a house, forced the closure of a road and knocked out electricity to adjacent neighborhoods.

The city says the landslide in the Duquesne Heights neighborhood worsened Sunday afternoon, pouring over a retaining wall and closing a section of roadway.

Officials say a house that was evacuated Friday evening "is now destroyed." The city says the owners were able to retrieve some essential belongings on Saturday.