Julia Zenkevich

Production Assistant, Summer 2019
Teresa Crawford / AP

 


On today's program: The NHL looks to restart the 2019-20 season with revised playoffs; pregnancy could offer insights into future health outcomes for moms and babies; the race for Pennsylvania’s 19th state House district heats up; and the “gig workers” of academia worry for their jobs. 

AP

 

On today's program: Applications for SNAP benefits are up; today is the deadline for mail-in ballot requests; a preview of one state House election; and a Pennsylvania company pivots from making football jerseys to face masks. 

Gene J. Puskar / AP

  On today's program: PA has little recourse to help cities devastated by wage taxes out-of-work employees never accrued; Pittsburgh is slow to adopt plans for future climate migrants; and scientists question whether closing schools was the right call.

Joshua Pickering

On today's program: The new head of FBI Pittsburgh talks cybercrimes and counterterrorism; and astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson sheds a little light on the mysteries of the universe ahead of a rescheduled trip to Pittsburgh.

1Hood Media / Facebook

 

On today's program: 1Hood Media is creating COVID-19 content by and for Pittsburgh’s black and brown communities; PennDOT offers guidelines for car inspections and registration renewals during the pandemic; and the economic shutdown is giving scientists a unique opportunity to study air quality. 

Gensler

 

On today's program: The fate of the former Civic Arena site is again in limbo; for many, decision-making has changed due to coronavirus; and lots of conservation efforts have been put on hold during the pandemic.

VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System

 

On today's program: The U.S. Secretary of Veterans Affairs shares challenges facing veterans during the ongoing outbreak of COVID-19; changes to a Federal Reserve loan program could help oil and gas companies; and as Pennsylvania reopens, workers with pre-existing conditions fear the call to go back to work. 

Carlisle's Bridal of Pittsburgh

 

On today's program: How one business owner plans to adapt as she reopens this weekend; some rural hospitals are struggling to imagine a financial future; and performance arts students and teachers adapt to virtual learning.

Jessica Hill / AP

new study is looking to artificial intelligence to address the opioid crisis by identify people who may be at risk for opioid overdose.

Courtesy of Melissa Block

Journalism has changed dramatically since NPR's Melissa Block started her career, but she says one thing remains the same: people still care about in-depth and long-form reporting. 

Gene J. Puskar / AP

Local community members, journalists and officials will gather at the Ace Hotel Wednesday night for a discussion about gun control legislation that would seek to include the unique experiences of women, minorities and religious groups. 

Leah Jonns / Courtesy of La'Tasha Mayes

Applications opened this month on the Social Justice Rapid Response Fund, a new program providing grants to help support activists in Pittsburgh. 

Courtesy of Chardae Jones

Business analyst and writer Chardae Jones says her first one-year term as Braddock's appointed interim mayor won't be her last. Jones, who took over for newly elected Lt. Gov. John Fetterman this year, says she'll seek the Democrat party nomination for a full term in the May primary. 

Matt Nemeth / 90.5 WESA

Calls for investment in digital infrastructure have increased across the country. More than one-third of people in rural areas lack access to high-speed internet. 

Joshua Franzos / Courtesy of Dr. Arthur Levine

Dr. Arthur Levine is stepping down from his longtime post as dean of the University of Pittsburgh's School of Medicine and as its vice chancellor for health sciences to start a new Alzheimer’s research lab.

Keith Srakocic / AP Photo

While the nationwide unemployment rate for military veterans hit an 18-year low in January at 3.7 percent, the jobless rate for veterans in Pittsburgh remains at 6.7 percent.

Courtesy of Allies for Children

Researchers focused on the state of school breakfasts in Allegheny County report a combined participation rate of 57 percent for free or reduced cost breakfast, just shy of Gov. Tom Wolf’s statewide goal of 60 percent participation by 2020. 

Keith Srakocic / AP

The 38th annual Pittsburgh Home and Garden Show kicks off Friday at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center. John DeSantis, the event’s executive director, says that this year's 10-day event will have more than 1,800 vendors and include a farm-to-table, buy-local conference. 

Matt Rourke / AP

Pennsylvania Auditor General Eugene DePasquale wants to strengthen state laws against accepting gifts after an audit determined that officials in 18 of Pennsylvania’s 67 counties accepted gifts, meals or trips from firms competing to sell new voting machines to counties ahead of the 2020 election.

Egan Jimenez / Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs

A staffing shortage at the U.S. State Department and a global perception that diplomacy is in decline shouldn't prevent the United States from playing its role in resolving worldwide conflicts, according to former Assistant Secretary of State Rick Barton. 

Gene J. Puskar / AP

The Allegheny County Health Department has been criticized in community meetings and at a state legislative policy hearing for a lack of communication in the first several days after a Christmas Eve fire at Clairton Coke Works. How can outreach improve, what’s being done to repair the plant, and how can Pittsburghers protect themselves from emissions?

Andrew Medichini / AP

Over the next few days in Vatican City, Pope Francis will meet with bishops from around the world to address ongoing clergy sexual abuse scandals, including those accused in Pennsylvania. 

Josef Rabara

An estimated 2,400 lectures and 1,000 concerts were given at Terezín Concentration Camp during World War II, including Requiem, a Catholic funeral march composed by Giuseppe Verdi in 1874.

Courtesy of Sojourner House

Pennsylvania’s Supreme Court made a controversial decision in December, ruling that women who use drugs during pregnancy are not guilty of child abuse. The case involved a woman who gave birth to a child with neo-natal abstinence syndrome, which occurs when a baby is withdrawing from drugs they were exposed to in the womb.

Courtesy of the Heinz History Center

The African American History Commission Act was signed last year to recognize and highlight the resilience and cultural contributions of Africans and African Americans in the 400 years since they first landed in Virginia, by force as slaves. 

Samuel Black, director of African American programs at the Heinz History Center and immediate past president of the Association of African American Museums, joins 90.5 WESA's The Confluence to discuss the commission’s goals, Pittsburgh’s African American heritage and the cultural and historical impact on our region.

Keith Srakocic / AP

Last summer, companies across the country, including Mylan Pharmaceuticals in Pittsburgh, began recalling large quantities of blood pressure drugs after carcinogens were found in the medications. Commonly prescribed medications including valsartan, losartan, irbesartan and Amvalo were affected.

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

Many overdose fatalities in Pennsylvania are opioid-related, but deaths from methamphetamine and other stimulants are back on the rise. For people who use meth, especially those who also identify as LGBT+, resources can be scarce.

There is a growing need for queer-centered resources in Pittsburgh, says Tommy Brassell, a medical assistant at Central Outreach Wellness Center, a clinic that specializes in LGBT health care. 

Matthew Craig / Young Preservationists Association of Pittsburgh

Preserving historical buildings and landmarks “can be a force for a renewal of spirit,” according to Matthew Craig, executive director of Young Preservationists Association of Pittsburgh.

Ebrahim Noroozi / AP

Surgeons have successfully performed organ transplants for more than five decades, but patients still have to take powerful medication to prevent their bodies from rejecting the live-saving donations. 

Keith Srakocic / AP

Last year was Pittsburgh's wettest on record, triggering dozens of landslides, forcing people out of their homes and costing the city millions in repairs. 

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