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How Do You Teach Young Kids About September 11th?

Flight_93_National_Memorial6.JPG
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Most adults remember what they were doing and how they felt on September 11, 2001. But many children today weren't even born when Flight 93 crashed in Somerset County.

"Normally, we're telling the story to people who lived it," Flight 93 Memorial superintendent, Jeff Reinbold told the Pittsburgh Post Gazette. "What happens is the parents come to one of our rangers and say, 'You tell them.' It became apparent to us no one is talking to the youngest kids."

So two years ago, the National Park Service partnered with Mary Margaret Kerr, a professor of psychology in School of Education at the University of Pittsburgh to develop a Junior Ranger Handbook for children ages 6 to 12 to understand what happened at the Flight 93 crash site. Students at Pitt's Fanny Edel Falk Laboratory School visited the site recently to try out the booklets and gave feedback on what they learned.
 

Guests: Jeff Reinbold Flight 93 Memorial superintendent Mary Margaret Kerr Professor of psychology in the School of Education at the University of Pittsburgh

 
 

 

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