Kevin Gavin

Host of The Confluence

Kevin Gavin is a native Pittsburgher and has worked in public broadcasting since his college years. Gavin served as news director for 90.5 WDUQ for 34 years, and following the sale of the radio station by Duquesne University to Pittsburgh EPM, Inc., he was appointed Director of Internships and Training.

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Matt Rourke / AP

 


On today's program: Pittsburgh-area employees filed 100 complaints related to COVID-19 concerns with OSHA in the early months of the pandemic; professional sports teams with racist names and logos consider rebranding; and RealTime Interventions, a local live-arts production company, takes its events online.

MICHELLE R. SMITH / AP

KEVIN GAVIN: El presidente Trump firmó un memorando el martes que prohibía que los inmigrantes indocumentados fueran incluidos en el censo respecto al trazado de líneas para los distritos del Congreso. Esto ocurre después de que en 2019 la Corte Suprema rechazara su intento de preguntarles a los encuestados del censo si eran ciudadanos. Mónica Ruiz es la directora ejecutiva de Casa San José, un centro de recursos comunitarios que defiende y ayuda a los latinos a integrarse en el área de Pittsburgh.

Alan Diaz / AP

 


On today's program: The Trump campaign is suing 67 Pennsylvania counties over mail-in ballots; a key demographic that elected Donald Trump in the 2016 election is changing; and Carnegie Mellon University is using a phased approach to bring researchers back to the lab.

Hans Pennink / AP

 


On today's program: A possible COVID-19 vaccine moves into Phase 3 trials, but it could be another minimum of six months until Americans get the drug; the chancellor of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education is pushing for a system-wide redesign; and a brief history of the Pittsburgh left. 

Michelle R. Smith / AP

 


On today's program: A presidential memorandum on the U.S. Census could impact historically undercounted communities; the Biden campaign’s recommended climate change policy and the impacts on the energy industry in Western Pennsylvania; and how the candidates' policies on climate change might influence voters in the November election. 

Megan Harris / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: PWSA and elected officials announced the lead levels in water are now in compliance with EPA and DEP requirements; on the 30th anniversary of the ADA, advocates and activists look to the  future; and a new grant program will help minority business owners in Pennsylvania struggling due to the coronavirus. 

Lucy Perkins / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: Pittsburgher and longtime activist Sala Udin remembers Congressman John Lewis; advocates say holding businesses accountable for ADA compliance often falls to people with disabilities, not the city; and how Montgomery County is using contact tracers to get the coronavirus under control. 

 

Carolyn Kaster / AP

 


On today's program: People with disabilities are still facing new challenges 30 years after the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act; the economy is opening but experts say some industries are adapting to the “new normal” better than others; and a Chambersburg Post Office shows how COVID-19 safety precautions that got wrapped up in election-year politics.

Carolyn Kaster / AP

 

On today's program: The city is seeking applicants for a new LGBTQIA+ Commission that hopes to make Pittsburgh more inclusive; a Nigerian disability rights advocate makes a virtual journey to Pittsburgh to mark the 30th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act; and in a divided Pennsylvania town, three women are organizing anti-racist protests and bringing people together.

Sarah Kovash / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: Pittsburgh City Council is considering a proposal intended to strengthen the investigative authority of the Citizen Police Review Board; the Market Square Farmers Market is reopening with new safety precautions; and a new biography traces “The Epic Life of the King of Comics.”

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On today's program: An investigative report shows no support for a UPMC claim that the Pittsburgh region is seeing a “less severe” strain of the coronavirus; during the pandemic, the outlook for most of Pittsburgh’s independent restaurants is dismal; and a 94-year-old Rosie the Riveter is on a campaign for national recognition for the World War II heroes on the homefront.

Lucy Perkins / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: Amid unemployment rates stuck in the double digits and economic recession, housing prices in Pittsburgh are rebounding; Black women activists from decades ago continue to influence today’s demands for justice and equality; and confusing messages about the coronavirus in Pennsylvania make some question what’s safe. 

Gene J. Puskar / AP

 


On today's program: As Allegheny County is experiencing an increase in COVID-19 cases, officials are trying to slow the pandemic; an update on the U.S. Supreme Court’s latest rulings and a preview of what’s to come; and new legislation regarding Pennsylvania’s DUI laws could mean big changes for medical cannabis patients. 

Kiley Koscinski / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: Pennsylvania’s eviction moratorium is slated to end this Friday, but advocates say an extension is needed; summer camps are closed, but experts say learning can continue outside the classroom; and a rural Pennsylvania town is addressing police brutality. 

Seth Perlman / AP

 


On today's program: As families get ready for school to begin this fall, A+ Schools is releasing classroom and operations suggestions for Pittsburgh Public Schools during the pandemic; the University of Pittsburgh plans to use more solar power; and the invasive spotted lanternfly descends on southwestern PA. 

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA


 On today's program: Black, Young and Educated is organizing some of Pittsburgh’s biggest protests against racism and police brutality; a new proposed ordinance could prohibit tear gas, bean bag rounds, and some other crowd dispersal methods in Allegheny County; and architect David Lewis leaves a lasting legacy in Pittsburgh. 

Megan Harris / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: Mayor Bill Peduto discusses racism and policing in Pittsburgh; and the Hot Club of Pittsburgh introduces listeners to the wonders of jazz from the '20s and '30s. 

Keith Srakocic / AP

 


On today's program: Mayor Bill Peduto talks about the pandemic’s effects on Pittsburgh; an update on the latest U.S. Supreme Court decisions; and a historical look at Pittsburgh’s connection to healthcare.

Matt Rourke / AP

 


On today's program: President Trump’s re-election campaign is suing the Pennsylvania Department of State over the June 2 primary; the Heinz History Center is reopening with a new exhibit highlighting historical Pittsburghers; and environmental groups are working towards anti-racist actions. 

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: Today, Allegheny County will begin enforcing a ban on consumption of alcohol inside bars and restaurants; local nonprofit Ujamaa Collective is switching its focus during the pandemic and protests against police brutality; and thousands of Pennsylvanians are being called back to work, but not all are prepared to return. 

Mark Nootbaar / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: A look at what economic recovery from the shutdown might look like in southwestern Pennsylvania; YWCA Greater Pittsburgh returns to its core mission; and as businesses across the country reopen, music venues continue to struggle. 

Ted S. Warren / AP

 

On today's program: Pennsylvania’s Lieutenant Governor is encouraging people with nonviolent marijuana-related convictions to apply for pardons; a new executive order aims to limit the number of legal immigrants coming to the U.S.; and polls suggest most Americans support police reform, but how might that impact their choices at the ballot box in November? 

Sarah Schneider / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: Pittsburgh Public Schools look to lower the number of arrests at District schools; and Pittsburgh’s film industry prepares to return to work. 

Megan Harris / 90.5 WESA

 


On today's program: Mayor Bill Peduto assembles a Community Task Force on Police Reform;  Brighton Rehabilitation and Wellness Center deals with the worst COVID-19 outbreak in the state; and the Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership expands outdoor dining and walking spaces downtown. 

Gene J. Puskar / AP

 

On today's program: State Rep. Ed Gainey discusses his legislation that would change use of force laws in Pennsylvania; coronavirus cases in western Pennsylvania are going down, but Lyme disease cases are going up; and a Hazelwood nonprofit adapts to life during the pandemic.

KEITH SRAKOCIC / AP

 

On today's program: Michelle Kenney, Antwon Rose’s mother, pushes for new policing laws; and Friday marks Juneteenth, a celebration that marks the end of slavery on June 19, 1865. 

Jakob Lazzaro / 90.5 WESA

 

On today's program: The Allegheny Conference on Community Development evaluates Pittsburgh’s next steps towards economic recovery; a new textile could help healthcare workers working with COVID-19 patients; and pediatricians weigh in on the safety of in-person playdates. 

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

 

On today's program: The University of Pittsburgh might require undergrads to take a new course in Black studies; Pennsylvania’s natural gas industry tries to ride out the pandemic; and more people consider at-home elder care in their later years. 

Katie Blackley / 90.5 WESA

 

On today's program: Protests and demonstrations demanding an end to racism and police violence against people of color continue across the country; Mike Turzai retires as Speaker of the Pennsylvania House; and local nonprofits are working hard to provide more aid during the coronavirus pandemic. 

Gene J. Puskar / AP

 

On today's program: Allegheny County prepares to enter the green phase of reopening; and a former Stanford University freshman dean discusses harms of overparenting and how to fix it.

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